Great Salt Lake Clothing Company http://www.gslclothing.com Wed, 29 Mar 2017 22:41:39 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.4.11 Little Cottonwood Canyon Films http://www.gslclothing.com/little-cottonwood-canyon-films/ Tue, 14 Apr 2015 20:51:40 +0000 http://www.gslclothing.com/?p=2123 Aerial drones have been deployed in the past mainly for military and surveillance operations, but in recent years they have had a growing number of uses for commercial purposes - especially in the filming of outdoor sports and real estate. My first experience with one of these flying camera drones came at the Big Cottonwood Half Marathon where a drone flew overhead, filming the start of the race. I met Mike Barnard at Snowbird one Sunday afternoon this past winter. Mike is a bartender at the Tram Club, and I like to stop at the Tram Club for a few beers after a long day of skiing. Mike is originally from Ohio, so we quickly started up a conversation about our shared home state. This lead to me talking about GSL Clothing and Mike mentioned his own side project - Little Cottonwood Canyon Films. LCC Films is a local company consisting of Mike, his fleet of drones, a small staff, and a group of local athletes. I caught up with Mike and asked him a few questions to get some more insight into the vision of his company and what the future holds for LCC Films. 1. What brought you from Ohio to Utah? My friend Kyle and I wanted to work and ride at Snowbird for a season and well that was back in January 2008. 2. What are the goals of LCC Films? Film athletes? Real estate? Events? All of the above? Just tell us a little about the company and who your target market is... All the above and them some! I actually have a music video lined up with Gigi Love.  I'm going to collaborate with her and get her some killer Little Cottonwood Canyon aerials, should turn out pretty sweet. She actually lives at the mouth of the canyon. We're going to shoot at her place. I'm thinking about starting lessons for all the other nerds out there who would like to learn and don't want to buy a setup just to crash. It's inevitable, so work the simulator then take it to the fields. 3. How did you get into flying and how long have you been doing it for? How many drones do you currently own? I actually found a computer in the dumpsters at Snowbird so I took it home. Turned out to be a decent computer that needed a little loving to get back up and running, a good buddy was up for the task and he had a LaTrax Alias (quad copter) he never flew it so he traded me straight up. I got the Blade 350 QX (holds a GoPro) for a birthday present from my family on September 24th, 2014. I've accomplished quite a bit in 6 months but unfortunately after my first crash that was a pilot error (flying like a cowboy) I rebuilt and crashed mine six times and basically put me out of commission for the majority of the ski season. Tried replacing every part but the main board pretty much and still can't figure out why it won't make it past the calibration procedures. So I went out and bought the one I originally wanted that I didn't have enough money for at the beginning. I decided it's time to ship it back to Horizon Hobby and let them get it back to new. I currently have five drones. Blade 350 QX3, Walkera QR X350 Pro, Turnigy SK450, LaTrax Alias (does triple and quadruple flips/rolls :) ) and a Proto X (smaller then the inside of your palm) 4. How often do you crash? Any crazies stories? Well you know this answer. First time I attempted to fly in a pretty big park. I took it up way too far and lost control of it and couldn't get it back, with no return to home feature, it ended up falling out of the sky over top of a neighborhood and I had no idea where it landed. I only saw the direction it came down in and a ballpark idea of about how far away it was. Remember the park was pretty big. :) I ended up retrieving it after a solid 60 minutes of walking through the neighborhood. Ooops! 5. I saw on your FB page that you are dealing with some issues with the FAA. What are they doing to try to regulate the commercial use of drones? The FAA has came up with some rules and regulations. There's going to be a license every pilot will have to have in order to use them commercially, nothing too insane. They are here to stay though. They're just to cool! 6. What are your future plans for the company? Any upcoming films we should be on the lookout for? Travel!! Spread the LCC Films through the states and maybe overseas! I just put an Athletes page up on the main site and have a solid Ski and Snowboard team with some professional hang glider and paragliders too. Whenever this next storm hits, be ready for something shortly after. Cheers!

The post Little Cottonwood Canyon Films appeared first on Great Salt Lake Clothing Company.

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Aerial drones have been deployed in the past mainly for military and surveillance operations, but in recent years they have had a growing number of uses for commercial purposes – especially in the filming of outdoor sports and real estate. My first experience with one of these flying camera drones came at the Big Cottonwood Half Marathon where a drone flew overhead, filming the start of the race.

mikesnowboardI met Mike Barnard at Snowbird one Sunday afternoon this past winter. Mike is a bartender at the Tram Club, and I like to stop at the Tram Club for a few beers after a long day of skiing. Mike is originally from Ohio, so we quickly started up a conversation about our shared home state. This lead to me talking about GSL Clothing and Mike mentioned his own side project – Little Cottonwood Canyon Films.

LCC Films is a local company consisting of Mike, his fleet of drones, a small staff, and a group of local athletes. I caught up with Mike and asked him a few questions to get some more insight into the vision of his company and what the future holds for LCC Films.

1. What brought you from Ohio to Utah?

My friend Kyle and I wanted to work and ride at Snowbird for a season and well that was back in January 2008.

2. What are the goals of LCC Films? Film athletes? Real estate? Events? All of the above? Just tell us a little about the company and who your target market is…

All the above and them some! I actually have a music video lined up with Gigi Love.  I’m going to collaborate with her and get her some killer Little Cottonwood Canyon aerials, should turn out pretty sweet. She actually lives at the mouth of the canyon. We’re going to shoot at her place.

I’m thinking about starting lessons for all the other nerds out there who would like to learn and don’t want to buy a setup just to crash. It’s inevitable, so work the simulator then take it to the fields.

3. How did you get into flying and how long have you been doing it for? How many drones do you currently own?

I actually found a computer in the dumpsters at Snowbird so I took it home. Turned out to be a decent computer that needed a little loving to get back up and running, a good buddy was up for the task and he had a LaTrax Alias (quad copter) he never flew it so he traded me straight up. I got the Blade 350 QX (holds a GoPro) for a birthday present from my family on September 24th, 2014. I’ve accomplished quite a bit in 6 months but unfortunately after my first crash that was a pilot error (flying like a cowboy) I rebuilt and crashed mine six times and basically put me out of commission for the majority of the ski season. Tried replacing every part but the main board pretty much and still can’t figure out why it won’t make it past the calibration procedures. So I went out and bought the one I originally wanted that I didn’t have enough money for at the beginning. I decided it’s time to ship it back to Horizon Hobby and let them get it back to new. I currently have five drones. Blade 350 QX3, Walkera QR X350 Pro, Turnigy SK450, LaTrax Alias (does triple and quadruple flips/rolls :) ) and a Proto X (smaller then the inside of your palm)

4. How often do you crash? Any crazies stories?

Well you know this answer. First time I attempted to fly in a pretty big park. I took it up way too far and lost control of it and couldn’t get it back, with no return to home feature, it ended up falling out of the sky over top of a neighborhood and I had no idea where it landed. I only saw the direction it came down in and a ballpark idea of about how far away it was. Remember the park was pretty big. :) I ended up retrieving it after a solid 60 minutes of walking through the neighborhood. Ooops!

5. I saw on your FB page that you are dealing with some issues with the FAA. What are they doing to try to regulate the commercial use of drones?

The FAA has came up with some rules and regulations. There’s going to be a license every pilot will have to have in order to use them commercially, nothing too insane. They are here to stay though. They’re just to cool!

6. What are your future plans for the company? Any upcoming films we should be on the lookout for?

Travel!! Spread the LCC Films through the states and maybe overseas! I just put an Athletes page up on the main site and have a solid Ski and Snowboard team with some professional hang glider and paragliders too. Whenever this next storm hits, be ready for something shortly after. Cheers!

The post Little Cottonwood Canyon Films appeared first on Great Salt Lake Clothing Company.

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Miss Black Utah 2015 Chancè Gatoro http://www.gslclothing.com/miss-black-utah-2015-chance-gatoro/ Mon, 09 Feb 2015 17:09:29 +0000 http://www.gslclothing.com/?p=2077 Chancè Gatoro is a student at Utah State University, studying pre-law with a minor in Political Science. She moved to the US when she was 11, after living in a refugee camp in Uganda for 3 years. She is a former Miss Congo United Nations, Miss Congo USA First Princess and Miss Congo Utah. Chancè reached out to us for support, so we thought we would do a short Q&A with her to spotlight her cause and help support her bid for Miss Black USA 2015. What was the process to becoming Miss Black Utah and why was it something you sought out? I've always loved the thought of changing lives. Being apart of a pageant was a way for me to do so. To become Miss Black Utah we compete in Platform (mine is "educating our future"), on stage questions, evening wear competition, per-competition interview questions with judges, fitness/swimsuit wear, and community service. What's your goal for this years competition? My goal this year is to unit the African Community in Utah. How can people support your bid for Miss Black USA? I am in need of all the support I can receive. You can go to my FB page and GoFund Me page to learn more on how you can support me on my journey to winning Miss Black USA. (Also check out her official website.) If you won, would what you do first? If I was to Win Miss Black USA, my first task would be to enlarge my foundation on education and to help get the students I work with more scholarship chances. What issues have you used your title as Miss Black Utah to highlight? Any good stories from the work you've done/people you've met? Being Miss Black Utah USA has really helped me with so much, it's hard to narrow down. One of my favorite things I would say is getting to travel to different schools, events, and other places to share my story on the importance of education. The fact that I get to inspire people through my experiences has been amazing to me. What's the toughest thing about being Miss Black Utah and the most rewarding? The hardest thing about being Miss Black Utah is getting support from Utah. It's no secret that Utah does not have the largest African American Community therefor it makes it a little tougher. The best part about being Miss Black Utah is being able help our community right here in my own state of Utah! From her website: "My platform is to educate the Future of Congo and America. I am part of the Founders of ASFACA nonprofit organization that helps build and maintain a school and an orphanage in the Congo. I am also the spokesperson for Global outreach. I work closely with the company to raise money to sponsor children attending and living at the Mango School Tree and orphanage. With the tittle Miss Black USA 2015, I have been going to different High Schools and Middle Schools to speak to students about the importance of Educations and sharing my experience as a young African woman who was born and raised in the Congo. " For more info on how you can support Chancè, check out her Support Page on her website.

The post Miss Black Utah 2015 Chancè Gatoro appeared first on Great Salt Lake Clothing Company.

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IMG_4618Chancè Gatoro is a student at Utah State University, studying pre-law with a minor in Political Science. She moved to the US when she was 11, after living in a refugee camp in Uganda for 3 years. She is a former Miss Congo United Nations, Miss Congo USA First Princess and Miss Congo Utah.

Chancè reached out to us for support, so we thought we would do a short Q&A with her to spotlight her cause and help support her bid for Miss Black USA 2015.

What was the process to becoming Miss Black Utah and why was it something you sought out?

I’ve always loved the thought of changing lives. Being apart of a pageant was a way for me to do so. To become Miss Black Utah we compete in Platform (mine is “educating our future”), on stage questions, evening wear competition, per-competition interview questions with judges, fitness/swimsuit wear, and community service.

What’s your goal for this years competition?

My goal this year is to unit the African Community in Utah.

How can people support your bid for Miss Black USA?

I am in need of all the support I can receive. You can go to my FB page and GoFund Me page to learn more on how you can support me on my journey to winning Miss Black USA. (Also check out her official website.)

If you won, would what you do first?

If I was to Win Miss Black USA, my first task would be to enlarge my foundation on education and to help get the students I work with more scholarship chances.

What issues have you used your title as Miss Black Utah to highlight? Any good stories from the work you’ve done/people you’ve met?

Being Miss Black Utah USA has really helped me with so much, it’s hard to narrow down. One of my favorite things I would say is getting to travel to different schools, events, and other places to share my story on the importance of education. The fact that I get to inspire people through my experiences has been amazing to me.

What’s the toughest thing about being Miss Black Utah and the most rewarding?

The hardest thing about being Miss Black Utah is getting support from Utah. It’s no secret that Utah does not have the largest African American Community therefor it makes it a little tougher. The best part about being Miss Black Utah is being able help our community right here in my own state of Utah!

From her website:

“My platform is to educate the Future of Congo and America. I am part of the Founders of ASFACA nonprofit organization that helps build and maintain a school and an orphanage in the Congo. I am also the spokesperson for Global outreach. I work closely with the company to raise money to sponsor children attending and living at the Mango School Tree and orphanage. With the tittle Miss Black USA 2015, I have been going to different High Schools and Middle Schools to speak to students about the importance of Educations and sharing my experience as a young African woman who was born and raised in the Congo. ”

For more info on how you can support Chancè, check out her Support Page on her website.

The post Miss Black Utah 2015 Chancè Gatoro appeared first on Great Salt Lake Clothing Company.

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Local Utah Beard Product Roundup http://www.gslclothing.com/local-utah-beard-product-roundup/ Fri, 06 Feb 2015 17:32:45 +0000 http://www.gslclothing.com/?p=2061 In the late summer of 2014 - after many failed attempts over the years - I finally gained the inner strength to grow a beard. With this beard came a whole new set of responsibilities, including the duty of keeping it well groomed and conditioned. Thus I set out on an internet quest - in search of the knowledge and tools that would be needed to help care for my new facial hair. Before that point in time I never knew that the world of beard care products even existed. Beard oils, beard balms, beard butters, beard waxes. I wasn't sure where to even start. Some of the bigger named players seemed to be Beard Balm, The Texas Beard Company, and Honest Amish. I could go on forever listing all of the products out there at the moment - especially if you start looking around on Etsy. But these were the top 3 that I continued to see through Google and searching around on Amazon. I ended up going with the Beard Balm (out of Detroit) just because it was probably the first one I came across on Amazon and it had great reviews - and I hadn't even yet thought to look for a local Utah beard product. Once the balm arrived and I put it on for the first time, I was hooked. I loved the way it felt on my face and the way it made my beard shine - and my girlfriend loved how much softer my beard felt, along with the scent from the balm. After a few days of using the product and admiring the sticker on the tin - which included the ingredients - I decided to google again and find a "how to" guide for making my own "beard balm". A week or two later, my beeswax, shea butter, and oils arrived in the mail and next thing you know, I am in my girlfriend's kitchen cooking my own homemade "Beard Butter". Around this same time, Dave and I decided to start a Utah inspired clothing company... and just like that Great Salt Lake Beard Butter was born. Here is a short list of a few other local folks that are making beard products that we have come in contact with over the last month: Royal Beard Care In their own words: "At Royal Beard Care Company we sell all-natural beard oils and mustache waxes. We use high quality carrier and essential oils for our beard oils and all-natural bees wax for our mustache waxes. What separates us from other beard care companies is our emphasis on local companies and a local lifestyle. At Royal Beard Care Co., we are taking the steps to promote local artists through our YouTube channel called Royal Sound Series. We are looking to put our products into local barber shops and salons. We promote an adventurous lifestyle that many Utah residents embrace. We envision Royal Beard Care Company as a successful staple to the bearded community in Utah as well as across the United States. We hope to establish a strong local following that will enable us to promote great local artists and great local startups like those who are helping us now. As we expand, we hope to have our products available to bearded man everywhere, allowing our brand and lifestyle to grow and flourish. If all goes well with our beard products, we would probably look into expanding our products to include those men who may not grow or wear a beard." Brother Brigham The motto of this St George based company is: "Strong enough for a Pioneer. Gentle enough for a Prophet."  These guys currently sell a beard oil, a wide toothed comb, and a shampoo and body bar.  In their own words: "I started Brother Brigham's because I have a beard and wanted a beard oil that didn't stink. Most beard oils use essential oils for the scent, and I don't really think essential oils smell good. Brother Brigham's uses a custom blend of fragrance oils, which smells much better, and avocado oil which is great for the beard and skin. The brand has done surprisingly well and we have great fans." Olio Skin Care Olio is all about treating your beard as well as the skin beneath your beard. Their line of products include several beard, skin, and hair oils, a beard brush, and several face and body scrubs.  From their website: "Olio Skin Care is headquartered in beautiful Utah. We offer natural skincare that real people can use every day. Do you wonder where to find a product that you can use all over your body? With no fear of hidden ingredients? Most cosmetics, lotions and body care products contain ingredients we wouldn't dare consume. Don’t feed your largest organ anything you don’t want in your blood stream. 60% of what is on our skin gets absorbed. Olio Skin Care Skin Oil can be used day after day without worry of buildup, drying or discoloration. We do not use fragrance. Our products do not contain preservatives or parabens to extend shelf life. We make small batches, with a lot of pride. We care what goes on your skin because you do. Olio Skin Care Oils, rich in vitamins and antioxidants, will soothe and heal your skin. Salts packed with over 60+ trace minerals will replenish what pollutants and outside elements strip. Your skin will begin to look and feel alive. " These guys were kind enough to send over a sample of their unscented Beard, Face, & Shave Oil, which Dave and I have been applying every morning to our beards when we get into work. It makes a great compliment to our Beard Butter! Beard Brew I don't have too much info on this company, but I came across them on Instagram and they seem to have a pretty popular following.  From their Instagram page: "Organic essential oils/vitamins for a healthy, shiny & perfectly groomed beard. That'll keep [...]

The post Local Utah Beard Product Roundup appeared first on Great Salt Lake Clothing Company.

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In the late summer of 2014 – after many failed attempts over the years – I finally gained the inner strength to grow a beard. With this beard came a whole new set of responsibilities, including the duty of keeping it well groomed and conditioned. Thus I set out on an internet quest – in search of the knowledge and tools that would be needed to help care for my new facial hair.

Before that point in time I never knew that the world of beard care products even existed. Beard oils, beard balms, beard butters, beard waxes. I wasn’t sure where to even start.

Some of the bigger named players seemed to be Beard Balm, The Texas Beard Company, and Honest Amish. I could go on forever listing all of the products out there at the moment – especially if you start looking around on Etsy. But these were the top 3 that I continued to see through Google and searching around on Amazon. I ended up going with the Beard Balm (out of Detroit) just because it was probably the first one I came across on Amazon and it had great reviews – and I hadn’t even yet thought to look for a local Utah beard product.

Once the balm arrived and I put it on for the first time, I was hooked. I loved the way it felt on my face and the way it made my beard shine – and my girlfriend loved how much softer my beard felt, along with the scent from the balm.

After a few days of using the product and admiring the sticker on the tin – which included the ingredients – I decided to google again and find a “how to” guide for making my own “beard balm”.

A week or two later, my beeswax, shea butter, and oils arrived in the mail and next thing you know, I am in my girlfriend’s kitchen cooking my own homemade “Beard Butter”. Around this same time, Dave and I decided to start a Utah inspired clothing company… and just like that Great Salt Lake Beard Butter was born.

Here is a short list of a few other local folks that are making beard products that we have come in contact with over the last month:

Royal Beard Care

royal-beard-logo
In their own words: “At Royal Beard Care Company we sell all-natural beard oils and mustache waxes. We use high quality carrier and essential oils for our beard oils and all-natural bees wax for our mustache waxes. What separates us from other beard care companies is our emphasis on local companies and a local lifestyle. At Royal Beard Care Co., we are taking the steps to promote local artists through our YouTube channel called Royal Sound Series. We are looking to put our products into local barber shops and salons. We promote an adventurous lifestyle that many Utah residents embrace.

We envision Royal Beard Care Company as a successful staple to the bearded community in Utah as well as across the United States. We hope to establish a strong local following that will enable us to promote great local artists and great local startups like those who are helping us now. As we expand, we hope to have our products available to bearded man everywhere, allowing our brand and lifestyle to grow and flourish. If all goes well with our beard products, we would probably look into expanding our products to include those men who may not grow or wear a beard.”

Brother Brigham

brothers
The motto of this St George based company is: “Strong enough for a Pioneer. Gentle enough for a Prophet.”  These guys currently sell a beard oil, a wide toothed comb, and a shampoo and body bar.  In their own words: “I started Brother Brigham’s because I have a beard and wanted a beard oil that didn’t stink. Most beard oils use essential oils for the scent, and I don’t really think essential oils smell good. Brother Brigham’s uses a custom blend of fragrance oils, which smells much better, and avocado oil which is great for the beard and skin. The brand has done surprisingly well and we have great fans.”

Olio Skin Care

OBCO_logo
Olio is all about treating your beard as well as the skin beneath your beard. Their line of products include several beard, skin, and hair oils, a beard brush, and several face and body scrubs.  From their website: “Olio Skin Care is headquartered in beautiful Utah. We offer natural skincare that real people can use every day. Do you wonder where to find a product that you can use all over your body? With no fear of hidden ingredients? Most cosmetics, lotions and body care products contain ingredients we wouldn’t dare consume. Don’t feed your largest organ anything you don’t want in your blood stream.

60% of what is on our skin gets absorbed. Olio Skin Care Skin Oil can be used day after day without worry of buildup, drying or discoloration. We do not use fragrance. Our products do not contain preservatives or parabens to extend shelf life. We make small batches, with a lot of pride. We care what goes on your skin because you do.

Olio Skin Care Oils, rich in vitamins and antioxidants, will soothe and heal your skin. Salts packed with over 60+ trace minerals will replenish what pollutants and outside elements strip. Your skin will begin to look and feel alive. ”

These guys were kind enough to send over a sample of their unscented Beard, Face, & Shave Oil, which Dave and I have been applying every morning to our beards when we get into work. It makes a great compliment to our Beard Butter!

Beard Brew

beard-brew
I don’t have too much info on this company, but I came across them on Instagram and they seem to have a pretty popular following.  From their Instagram page: “Organic essential oils/vitamins for a healthy, shiny & perfectly groomed beard. That’ll keep you looking, feeling & smelling amazing! Brewed in Slc,UT

Their Etsy page offers up beard oils, beard wash, a mustache wax, a beard brush, and even a long sleeved shirt with their logo on it.

 
So if you are in the market for a local Utah beard product (other than our Beard Butter) – give one of these local companies a look!

The post Local Utah Beard Product Roundup appeared first on Great Salt Lake Clothing Company.

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Interview with Local Skateboarder Richie Dominguez http://www.gslclothing.com/interview-local-skateboarder-richie-dominguez/ http://www.gslclothing.com/interview-local-skateboarder-richie-dominguez/#comments Wed, 07 Jan 2015 20:40:42 +0000 http://www.gslclothing.com/?p=1935 Part of the purpose of our blog is to not only talk about interesting places to visit in Utah and showcase local businesses, but also talk to and promote interesting people in the community. Richie Dominguez is a 20 year old local skateboarder that contacted us. He very politely asked us if he could be a brand ambassador for GSL Clothing. He told us about his dedication to skateboarding and talked about how he wanted to rep our local brand amongst his skateboarding friends. We were super stoked to connect with someone that seemed very passionate about the sport that he loves, but also seemed passionate about supporting our local products. Richie has done a great job spreading the word about GSL via his Instagram page, so in turn, we wanted to showcase Richie and his skateboarding talents here on our blog. Here is a short Q& A we did with Richie about his love for skateboarding. What was the first type of skateboard that you owned? How did you get into skating? My very first skateboard was a Walmart board. I was like 10 years old and remember my friends Taner, Eren, my brother Alex, and myself were just playing Tony Hawk Pro Skater and it looked like fun being able to do all those hard tricks and they looked so easy. So we begged our parents to buy us a skateboard and we went to Walmart and I remember grabbing this brown board with black wheels - its looked pretty awesome at that age, so we went back to my house and we tried taking down this little hill. I just remember all of us falling and getting back up and just looking at the board and I was thinking like "how can Tony Hawk do this??" But ever since that day we tried learning how to skate and after these years I still love skating and I'm still learning new tricks everyday. Where are some of your favorite places to skate around Utah? I really like skating anywhere in Utah... just cruising the streets and finding rails or ledges and gaps to skate. Utah has a lot of amazing places to skate, and the days I don't feel like cruising around I just hit up my local park which is Kearns Skatepark and I will just skating with all my friends and have a good time. Who are some professional skaters that you idolize? I really look up Ryan Sheckler. This man has taught me that when I fall I should get back up and try again as he always does. He always pushes himself to the limit to succeed in what he wants. People say its "Go Big or Go Home" but to Ryan it's just "Go Big". After watching his new Plan B part, it makes me want to push myself to that limit so I succeed in what I want. Favorite skate movie? My favorite skate movie is called the "The Motivation". It's about eight of the world's best pro-skateboarders prepare for the upcoming Street League Championship in NYC. Each equally talented, they all must overcome unique challenges - family pressures, injuries, money, fame and their own internal struggles - for a chance to win $200,000 and the title of best street-skateboarder in the world. Do you play any other sports or do you just focus on skating? Do you keep skating in the winter? I really enjoy snowboarding as a second sport. It's fun and it's quick. But I also skate in the winter when I get a chance at an indoor park or anywhere that not covered in snow. What are your future plans? Do you want to compete or do you just skate for fun? I plan on just skating and keep pushing forward and just hoping that I don't get hurt so I can just keep doing what I love and having fun with everybody. I already do both I have fun and compete because every day is a constant battle with yourself and trying to land a certain trick. I've been there many times where I have to go back and do the trick again because there's that one day I have it and then there's other days when I don't have it. Every day is a competition with yourself in trying to land a trick. But we still always have fun with it. There are always friends there to support you and if you don't ride away with the trick they're going to be there to have your back saying "you got it next time" - so we always have fun skating, no matter what.

The post Interview with Local Skateboarder Richie Dominguez appeared first on Great Salt Lake Clothing Company.

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Part of the purpose of our blog is to not only talk about interesting places to visit in Utah and showcase local businesses, but also talk to and promote interesting people in the community.

richie2Richie Dominguez is a 20 year old local skateboarder that contacted us. He very politely asked us if he could be a brand ambassador for GSL Clothing. He told us about his dedication to skateboarding and talked about how he wanted to rep our local brand amongst his skateboarding friends. We were super stoked to connect with someone that seemed very passionate about the sport that he loves, but also seemed passionate about supporting our local products.

Richie has done a great job spreading the word about GSL via his Instagram page, so in turn, we wanted to showcase Richie and his skateboarding talents here on our blog. Here is a short Q& A we did with Richie about his love for skateboarding.

What was the first type of skateboard that you owned? How did you get into skating?
My very first skateboard was a Walmart board.

I was like 10 years old and remember my friends Taner, Eren, my brother Alex, and myself were just playing Tony Hawk Pro Skater and it looked like fun being able to do all those hard tricks and they looked so easy. So we begged our parents to buy us a skateboard and we went to Walmart and I remember grabbing this brown board with black wheels – its looked pretty awesome at that age, so we went back to my house and we tried taking down this little hill. I just remember all of us falling and getting back up and just looking at the board and I was thinking like “how can Tony Hawk do this??” But ever since that day we tried learning how to skate and after these years I still love skating and I’m still learning new tricks everyday.

Where are some of your favorite places to skate around Utah?
I really like skating anywhere in Utah… just cruising the streets and finding rails or ledges and gaps to skate. Utah has a lot of amazing places to skate, and the days I don’t feel like cruising around I just hit up my local park which is Kearns Skatepark and I will just skating with all my friends and have a good time.

Who are some professional skaters that you idolize?
I really look up Ryan Sheckler. This man has taught me that when I fall I should get back up and try again as he always does. He always pushes himself to the limit to succeed in what he wants. People say its “Go Big or Go Home” but to Ryan it’s just “Go Big”. After watching his new Plan B part, it makes me want to push myself to that limit so I succeed in what I want.

Favorite skate movie?
My favorite skate movie is called the “The Motivation”. It’s about eight of the world’s best pro-skateboarders prepare for the upcoming Street League Championship in NYC. Each equally talented, they all must overcome unique challenges – family pressures, injuries, money, fame and their own internal struggles – for a chance to win $200,000 and the title of best street-skateboarder in the world.

Do you play any other sports or do you just focus on skating? Do you keep skating in the winter?
I really enjoy snowboarding as a second sport. It’s fun and it’s quick. But I also skate in the winter when I get a chance at an indoor park or anywhere that not covered in snow.

What are your future plans? Do you want to compete or do you just skate for fun?
I plan on just skating and keep pushing forward and just hoping that I don’t get hurt so I can just keep doing what I love and having fun with everybody.

I already do both I have fun and compete because every day is a constant battle with yourself and trying to land a certain trick. I’ve been there many times where I have to go back and do the trick again because there’s that one day I have it and then there’s other days when I don’t have it. Every day is a competition with yourself in trying to land a trick. But we still always have fun with it. There are always friends there to support you and if you don’t ride away with the trick they’re going to be there to have your back saying “you got it next time” – so we always have fun skating, no matter what.

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Sugar House Council Chair – Amy Barry http://www.gslclothing.com/sugar-house-council-chair-amy-barry/ Tue, 06 Jan 2015 16:08:48 +0000 http://www.gslclothing.com/?p=1931 Sugar House is one of the oldest neighborhoods in Salt Lake City, but also one of the hippest and most popular places to live, shop, and hang out for local SLC residents. We recently talked to Sugar House Council Chair Amy Barry about current issues facing the neighborhood and plans for the future of the Sugar House area. How long have you been the chair of the Sugar House Council? What drew you to that responsibility? I have been the chair of the Sugar House Community Council since November 2014. I have served on the SHCC for 6 years previously in various capacities as Trustee, Secretary and Vice-chair prior to this most recent election. I originally decided to get involved due to the escalation of new development so close to my house. I wanted to stay on top of all that was going on and participate in the community voice. What's the toughest issue that's come across your desk since you joined the council? I would have to say the Sugar House Streetcar extension has been the most divisive for our community. I talked to hundreds of people during that time and can honestly say while there was a very vocal group at work overwhelmingly there was no consensus of opinion among my neighbors. People were angry and frustrated and that didn't bring out the best behavior in the community. What's the council's vision for Sugar House in 5 years? How about 10 years? The SHCC looks to the Sugar House Master Plan on file with Salt Lake City as the guiding principles for the community and business district. The master plan was most recently amended in 2013 for the business district, but the whole plan dates back to 2009. It calls for walkability, pedestrian oriented development, a more holistic approach to transportation, saving our historic architecture and protecting our neighborhoods. What's the best way residents of Sugar House can support that vision? Participate. Residents of Sugar House do not always agree on what this vision means or how to achieve it. That is OK. My task as chair of the SHCC is to help educate my neighbors on the issues so they can come to their own conclusions based on facts and not rumors or fear mongering. The SHCC works to disseminate that information and help residents participate effectively in the process. As an independent nonprofit the SHCC is recognized by SLC as a community voice and with that voice comes many opportunities to stay informed and voice your opinion. Interested people can sign up for our monthly email newsletter as www.sugarhousecouncil.org and click the “join” button on the homepage. Everyone is welcome to attend our meetings as well. Do you see Sugarhouse in competition with other neighborhoods in SLC? If not, why not? Honestly, no. Each neighborhood in SLC has its own identity that make it unique or desirable. We need not compete with other great neighborhoods, but rather just concentrate on what draws us to live, work or play here. Sugar House has a rich history that is based around transformation. The Sugar House we love today is not the same Sugar House my mother grew up in or the Sugar House my great grandparents helped build. We have a corner of SLC that is special and unique in its transformations and community. Are there any potential "game changers" out there for Sugar House residents and community? If so, what are they? My personal view is that the transformation we are currently in is a significant game changer for many residents. The core business district of Sugar House is most definitely changing in ways that many find uncomfortable and along the way some of found it too much and have moved on somewhere more suitable to their lifestyle. At the same time new people have moved in the area and they are excited about the possibilities of this changing community. The most consistent issue verbalized over the 6 years I have been on the SHCC is traffic and parking. Those will be never ending issues as the core area grows with no perfect solution.

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Sugar House is one of the oldest neighborhoods in Salt Lake City, but also one of the hippest and most popular places to live, shop, and hang out for local SLC residents.

amyWe recently talked to Sugar House Council Chair Amy Barry about current issues facing the neighborhood and plans for the future of the Sugar House area.

How long have you been the chair of the Sugar House Council? What drew you to that responsibility?
I have been the chair of the Sugar House Community Council since November 2014. I have served on the SHCC for 6 years previously in various capacities as Trustee, Secretary and Vice-chair prior to this most recent election. I originally decided to get involved due to the escalation of new development so close to my house. I wanted to stay on top of all that was going on and participate in the community voice.

What’s the toughest issue that’s come across your desk since you joined the council?
I would have to say the Sugar House Streetcar extension has been the most divisive for our community. I talked to hundreds of people during that time and can honestly say while there was a very vocal group at work overwhelmingly there was no consensus of opinion among my neighbors. People were angry and frustrated and that didn’t bring out the best behavior in the community.

What’s the council’s vision for Sugar House in 5 years? How about 10 years?
The SHCC looks to the Sugar House Master Plan on file with Salt Lake City as the guiding principles for the community and business district. The master plan was most recently amended in 2013 for the business district, but the whole plan dates back to 2009. It calls for walkability, pedestrian oriented development, a more holistic approach to transportation, saving our historic architecture and protecting our neighborhoods.

What’s the best way residents of Sugar House can support that vision?
Participate. Residents of Sugar House do not always agree on what this vision means or how to achieve it. That is OK. My task as chair of the SHCC is to help educate my neighbors on the issues so they can come to their own conclusions based on facts and not rumors or fear mongering. The SHCC works to disseminate that information and help residents participate effectively in the process. As an independent nonprofit the SHCC is recognized by SLC as a community voice and with that voice comes many opportunities to stay informed and voice your opinion. Interested people can sign up for our monthly email newsletter as www.sugarhousecouncil.org and click the “join” button on the homepage. Everyone is welcome to attend our meetings as well.

Do you see Sugarhouse in competition with other neighborhoods in SLC? If not, why not?
Honestly, no. Each neighborhood in SLC has its own identity that make it unique or desirable. We need not compete with other great neighborhoods, but rather just concentrate on what draws us to live, work or play here.
Sugar House has a rich history that is based around transformation. The Sugar House we love today is not the same Sugar House my mother grew up in or the Sugar House my great grandparents helped build. We have a corner of SLC that is special and unique in its transformations and community.

Are there any potential “game changers” out there for Sugar House residents and community? If so, what are they?
My personal view is that the transformation we are currently in is a significant game changer for many residents. The core business district of Sugar House is most definitely changing in ways that many find uncomfortable and along the way some of found it too much and have moved on somewhere more suitable to their lifestyle. At the same time new people have moved in the area and they are excited about the possibilities of this changing community. The most consistent issue verbalized over the 6 years I have been on the SHCC is traffic and parking. Those will be never ending issues as the core area grows with no perfect solution.

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Utah’s Crossroads Urban Center http://www.gslclothing.com/utahs-crossroads-urban-center/ Tue, 30 Dec 2014 18:43:05 +0000 http://www.gslclothing.com/?p=1924 At the end of each month, we donate a can of soup for each shirt sold to the Crossroads Urban Center (see Our Cause). November was our first month in business and the shirts were not yet flying off the shelves, but we did manage to write a small check to help families in need. Business has picked up in December, so we are excited to write another, more significant check to the Crossroads group for the start of the New Year! If you are unfamiliar with the Crossroads Urban Center - they have been around since 1966 and are one of the busiest food pantries in the areas. In addition to food, they also run a thrift store and help organize many other local projects to help fight poverty. We talked to Glenn Bailey, Executive Director of the center, to get some more information on their mission. What’s the one thing that most people don’t realize about the Crossroads Urban Center? That Crossroads is more than just a food pantry. While we do operate one of Utah's busiest food pantries at 347 S. 400 East in Salt Lake City, we also have a free/low cost Thrift Store at 1385 W. Indiana (850 S.), and we coordinate a number of community organizing/advocacy project to strike at the root causes of hunger and poverty. Over the 50 years Crossroads has been around, we've founded groups like Wasatch Community Gardens, the Disabled Rights Action Committee, and Utahns Against Hunger among many others. How long have you worked at the Center? Why did you seek it out? I've been the Executive Director here for over 22 years. I also worked at Crossroads in various capacities for four years in the 80's. The first time I came here I just needed a job. I'd been doing low income neighborhood organizing in Oklahoma City, and came to believe that working with and for the poor and marginalized was what I needed to do with my life. The second time I was doing community organizing on the Southwest Side of Chicago, and they asked me to apply when they had a vacancy for the executive director. I was delighted to get the job. Crossroads is a fantastic place to work for social change. What’s been the most rewarding moment? The most challenging? Tough question. I think it's rewarding for me just to be able to get up every day and go to work at a place that does meaningful things for people in need. Everyone has to make a living, but I get to make a difference while doing it. How cool is that? It's challenging to watch people experience the grinding nature of poverty every day and see no end in sight. Fairness doesn't even begin to enter in to it. What’s the food/homeless issue you’d like legislators to address next session? Medicaid expansion. This should be a no brainer, but, of course, in Utah it isn't. This is the single biggest thing the legislature could do to improve the lives of the poorest citizens in our state, including homeless people. What’s the single most impactful way a single Salt Laker can help out at the Center? Donate time, money, food, clothing, or household essentials. Then contact a decision maker about public policies that combat poverty. We do charity, which is essential in our society. What we need is justice. If you'd like to help out at the Center, call them directly at (801) 364-7765 and let them know that you want to volunteer.

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At the end of each month, we donate a can of soup for each shirt sold to the Crossroads Urban Center (see Our Cause).

November was our first month in business and the shirts were not yet flying off the shelves, but we did manage to write a small check to help families in need. Business has picked up in December, so we are excited to write another, more significant check to the Crossroads group for the start of the New Year!

If you are unfamiliar with the Crossroads Urban Center – they have been around since 1966 and are one of the busiest food pantries in the areas. In addition to food, they also run a thrift store and help organize many other local projects to help fight poverty.

We talked to Glenn Bailey, Executive Director of the center, to get some more information on their mission.

What’s the one thing that most people don’t realize about the Crossroads Urban Center?
That Crossroads is more than just a food pantry. While we do operate one of Utah’s busiest food pantries at 347 S. 400 East in Salt Lake City, we also have a free/low cost Thrift Store at 1385 W. Indiana (850 S.), and we coordinate a number of community organizing/advocacy project to strike at the root causes of hunger and poverty. Over the 50 years Crossroads has been around, we’ve founded groups like Wasatch Community Gardens, the Disabled Rights Action Committee, and Utahns Against Hunger among many others.

How long have you worked at the Center? Why did you seek it out?
I’ve been the Executive Director here for over 22 years. I also worked at Crossroads in various capacities for four years in the 80’s. The first time I came here I just needed a job. I’d been doing low income neighborhood organizing in Oklahoma City, and came to believe that working with and for the poor and marginalized was what I needed to do with my life. The second time I was doing community organizing on the Southwest Side of Chicago, and they asked me to apply when they had a vacancy for the executive director. I was delighted to get the job. Crossroads is a fantastic place to work for social change.

What’s been the most rewarding moment? The most challenging?
Tough question. I think it’s rewarding for me just to be able to get up every day and go to work at a place that does meaningful things for people in need. Everyone has to make a living, but I get to make a difference while doing it. How cool is that? It’s challenging to watch people experience the grinding nature of poverty every day and see no end in sight. Fairness doesn’t even begin to enter in to it.

What’s the food/homeless issue you’d like legislators to address next session?
Medicaid expansion. This should be a no brainer, but, of course, in Utah it isn’t. This is the single biggest thing the legislature could do to improve the lives of the poorest citizens in our state, including homeless people.

What’s the single most impactful way a single Salt Laker can help out at the Center?
Donate time, money, food, clothing, or household essentials. Then contact a decision maker about public policies that combat poverty. We do charity, which is essential in our society. What we need is justice.

If you’d like to help out at the Center, call them directly at (801) 364-7765 and let them know that you want to volunteer.

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Interview with Travis Hill from Utahgram http://www.gslclothing.com/interview-travis-hill-utahgram/ http://www.gslclothing.com/interview-travis-hill-utahgram/#comments Tue, 23 Dec 2014 16:45:47 +0000 http://www.gslclothing.com/?p=1909 If you are a regular Instagram user living in Utah or you read our previous post "9 Utah Instagram Accounts You Need to Follow", then you probably already know of the Utahgram account. Instagram began in 2010 and as it gained popularity, people began creating local accounts to showcase the picturesque beauty of their particular cities, states, or regions. One of these local Utah accounts is the Utahgram account created by Travis Hill from St George Utah. After we mentioned Travis in our blog post, Travis gave back some "Instalove" - his mention of our account quickly doubled the number of people following us over night! Amazed and inspired by the power of Instagram, we wanted to talk to Travis and learn more about his love for Utah, how he came to start his Utahgram account, and what the future holds for Utahgram. Tell us about where you are from and how did you end up in Utah? I grew up in Idaho Falls, Idaho and lived there until I got married. My wife and I moved to St George a year after we were married. We moved in 1996 and are still here in Southern Utah. The weather and the beautiful Red mountains is what keeps me here. Utah is Amazing! When did you start the Utahgram account? I attached a photo showing my 1st post. June 2012 How long did it take to reach your 1st 1000 followers? This is hard to answer. I worked hard to get the 1st 1000 followers. I remembered it was the hardest to get there, but then after the 1st 1000 it continued to grow rapidly. I read online about your first Instameet in May 2014. How did that go? I'm sure you met a ton of cool people from around Utah... For the 1st Instameet, it was a big success. We teamed up with another local account called @igersstg. We had around 30+ attend it and we had several sponsors who helped out with this for some great prizes. Have you had any Instameets since then or plans for any future meetups? Is there somewhere we can go to find a schedule or do you just announce them on your account? We do plan on having more in the future. We would like to come to Northern Utah this upcoming Spring. We will post it on Instagram when this is to happen. We will also let the local news media and others know when this happens. It's fun to Meet other Instagramers in person. You get the chance to visit and meet them face to face and get to know the person who you normally see only on Instagram. How much of your time in a typical day is spent working on your Utahgram account? Or does it basically run itself at this point? It depends on who you ask. Ha If you ask my wife she will tell you 10 hours a day. But if you ask me I usually post 1 or 2 photos a day and on Contests days I spend a little more time getting those ready. So its around an hour a day. It's something I enjoy - looking at the many talented Photographers who use our tag #Utahgram and #Utah. I wish I could post more everyday because there are so many people with talent! Instagram is one of my many hobbies and I love it. Top 3 favorite locations to take photographs in Utah? I would say my favorite spot to take photos is Southern Utah because of the many parks we have this area. Zion, Bryce Canyon, Snow Canyon, Moab and much more. I wish I could get up to Northern Utah because there are so many great places there too. It's something about the Red rocks and desert that I love the most! What does the future hold for Utahgram? I read about 22K being your magic number of followers, but you are fast approaching that. Yes 22 K is a number fast approaching, but I know we will pass that in a hurry. We love supporting Utah companies and helping them grow too. With the many contests we run I want to make Utahgram the Utah hub to view photographs. I want everyone in Utah and other people from all over the world to know that Utah is a #beutahful place to visit and see! We Love Utah! Have you done anything else as far as creating a Utahgram website or merchandise? We do plan on getting a website soon! It is in the making and hope to launch it soon in the near future. Thanks for allowing me to tell a little about Utahgram.

The post Interview with Travis Hill from Utahgram appeared first on Great Salt Lake Clothing Company.

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If you are a regular Instagram user living in Utah or you read our previous post “9 Utah Instagram Accounts You Need to Follow“, then you probably already know of the Utahgram account.

Instagram began in 2010 and as it gained popularity, people began creating local accounts to showcase the picturesque beauty of their particular cities, states, or regions. One of these local Utah accounts is the Utahgram account created by Travis Hill from St George Utah. After we mentioned Travis in our blog post, Travis gave back some “Instalove” – his mention of our account quickly doubled the number of people following us over night!

Amazed and inspired by the power of Instagram, we wanted to talk to Travis and learn more about his love for Utah, how he came to start his Utahgram account, and what the future holds for Utahgram.

Tell us about where you are from and how did you end up in Utah?
I grew up in Idaho Falls, Idaho and lived there until I got married. My wife and I moved to St George a year after we were married. We moved in 1996 and are still here in Southern Utah. The weather and the beautiful Red mountains is what keeps me here. Utah is Amazing!

First photo posted on Utahgram

First photo posted on Utahgram

When did you start the Utahgram account?
I attached a photo showing my 1st post. June 2012

How long did it take to reach your 1st 1000 followers?
This is hard to answer. I worked hard to get the 1st 1000 followers. I remembered it was the hardest to get there, but then after the 1st 1000 it continued to grow rapidly.

I read online about your first Instameet in May 2014. How did that go? I’m sure you met a ton of cool people from around Utah…
For the 1st Instameet, it was a big success. We teamed up with another local account called @igersstg. We had around 30+ attend it and we had several sponsors who helped out with this for some great prizes.

Have you had any Instameets since then or plans for any future meetups? Is there somewhere we can go to find a schedule or do you just announce them on your account?
We do plan on having more in the future. We would like to come to Northern Utah this upcoming Spring. We will post it on Instagram when this is to happen. We will also let the local news media and others know when this happens.

It’s fun to Meet other Instagramers in person. You get the chance to visit and meet them face to face and get to know the person who you normally see only on Instagram.

Photo from first Utahgram instameet!

Photo from first Utahgram instameet!

How much of your time in a typical day is spent working on your Utahgram account? Or does it basically run itself at this point?
It depends on who you ask. Ha If you ask my wife she will tell you 10 hours a day. But if you ask me I usually post 1 or 2 photos a day and on Contests days I spend a little more time getting those ready. So its around an hour a day. It’s something I enjoy – looking at the many talented Photographers who use our tag #Utahgram and #Utah. I wish I could post more everyday because there are so many people with talent! Instagram is one of my many hobbies and I love it.

Top 3 favorite locations to take photographs in Utah?
I would say my favorite spot to take photos is Southern Utah because of the many parks we have this area. Zion, Bryce Canyon, Snow Canyon, Moab and much more. I wish I could get up to Northern Utah because there are so many great places there too. It’s something about the Red rocks and desert that I love the most!

What does the future hold for Utahgram? I read about 22K being your magic number of followers, but you are fast approaching that.
Yes 22 K is a number fast approaching, but I know we will pass that in a hurry. We love supporting Utah companies and helping them grow too. With the many contests we run I want to make Utahgram the Utah hub to view photographs. I want everyone in Utah and other people from all over the world to know that Utah is a #beutahful place to visit and see! We Love Utah!

Have you done anything else as far as creating a Utahgram website or merchandise?
We do plan on getting a website soon! It is in the making and hope to launch it soon in the near future.

Thanks for allowing me to tell a little about Utahgram.

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Unhinged Boutique – SLC & Provo http://www.gslclothing.com/unhinged-boutique-slc-provo/ Mon, 22 Dec 2014 16:54:13 +0000 http://www.gslclothing.com/?p=1902 Still looking for a one of a kind, last minute Christmas gift?  Something that can't be found here on our website? :)  If you live near the Sugar House or Provo area, Unhinged might have what you are looking for. Unhinged carries a wide variety of locally made (and found) clothing, artwork, and other gift items.  We talked to Amy Taggart, Wardrobe Stylist and manager of the Sugar House store, to get some more insight about their business and learn about local fashion trends for the upcoming year. How long have you guys been in business? Which location was opened first?  Do you have plans to expand to any other locations? Unhinged has been in business for three years. We opened in Sugar House first on 1121 E 2100 S. Our Provo store opened up in July of 2013, and then we relocated our Sugar House location to 2165 S Highland Dr in February of 2014. We're always looking for opportunities to grow our business into new areas. In addition to your Sugar House and Provo locations, can customers shop online for any of your products? Our plans for 2015 are getting our website current so that customers can shop conveniently online. We have been experimenting with various online shopping systems on Instagram, so customers can purchase certain products that we showcase via Instagram. What are some popular trends in local style? Is there anything that makes the fashion scene in Utah unique compared to other parts of the country? As far as local trends, people are really into the whole vintage scene and upcycled, repurposed clothing that has been modified. This is part of what makes the fashion scene unique here in Utah. People are really into setting their own trends and cultivating and making their own style. How many local clothing brands do you currently carry in your shops? We currently have about a dozen local clothing designers in each store. Besides clothing, what other types of products can be found in your stores? We also have an array of lifestyle products that are unique to our store including handcrafted local jewelry, barware, handbags, home decor, vintage decor like 1920's cameras, and radios, steamer trunks, and suitcases. There truly is something for everyone at Unhinged, and we are a destination location for trendsetters, pickers, collectors, and fashionistas. Any upcoming events planned for either of your stores? We are planning a Blogger event for January and will also continue to be part of the monthly Sugar House Art Walk which is the 2nd Friday of every month. This is a great promotional vehicle for local artists to promote their art. To find out more about Unhinged - including photos of clothing and other gift items, check out their Facebook page.

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Still looking for a one of a kind, last minute Christmas gift?  Something that can’t be found here on our website? :)  If you live near the Sugar House or Provo area, Unhinged might have what you are looking for.

Unhinged carries a wide variety of locally made (and found) clothing, artwork, and other gift items.  We talked to Amy Taggart, Wardrobe Stylist and manager of the Sugar House store, to get some more insight about their business and learn about local fashion trends for the upcoming year.

How long have you guys been in business? Which location was opened first?  Do you have plans to expand to any other locations?
Unhinged has been in business for three years. We opened in Sugar House first on 1121 E 2100 S. Our Provo store opened up in July of 2013, and then we relocated our Sugar House location to 2165 S Highland Dr in February of 2014. We’re always looking for opportunities to grow our business into new areas.

In addition to your Sugar House and Provo locations, can customers shop online for any of your products?
Our plans for 2015 are getting our website current so that customers can shop conveniently online. We have been experimenting with various online shopping systems on Instagram, so customers can purchase certain products that we showcase via Instagram.

What are some popular trends in local style? Is there anything that makes the fashion scene in Utah unique compared to other parts of the country?
As far as local trends, people are really into the whole vintage scene and upcycled, repurposed clothing that has been modified. This is part of what makes the fashion scene unique here in Utah. People are really into setting their own trends and cultivating and making their own style.

How many local clothing brands do you currently carry in your shops?
We currently have about a dozen local clothing designers in each store.

Besides clothing, what other types of products can be found in your stores?
We also have an array of lifestyle products that are unique to our store including handcrafted local jewelry, barware, handbags, home decor, vintage decor like 1920’s cameras, and radios, steamer trunks, and suitcases. There truly is something for everyone at Unhinged, and we are a destination location for trendsetters, pickers, collectors, and fashionistas.

Any upcoming events planned for either of your stores?
We are planning a Blogger event for January and will also continue to be part of the monthly Sugar House Art Walk which is the 2nd Friday of every month. This is a great promotional vehicle for local artists to promote their art.

To find out more about Unhinged – including photos of clothing and other gift items, check out their Facebook page.

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Humans of New York, Meet Humans of Salt Lake City http://www.gslclothing.com/humans-of-salt-lake-city/ Fri, 19 Dec 2014 19:45:53 +0000 http://www.gslclothing.com/?p=1892 If you’re not one of the over 11 million people who know about this movement, here’s a bit of background. Humans of New York began in November 2010 as the brainchild of Brandon Stanton. It was his goal to photograph 10,000 New Yorkers and plot them along with their photos on a map. However, as he began his work he started interacting with those he’d photograph, and this interaction turned into an interview of sorts. Fast forward to today, and Brandon has created a vast database of the human side of New York. His many photos of unique individuals along with tidbits of their own personal insights and stories are compiled into a New York Times Bestselling book. After the worldwide success of Humans of New York (HONY), people in cities around the world supplemented the phenomenon with work of their own: Facebook pages for Humans of Berlin, Rome, Amsterdam and San Francisco have cropped up, creating candid snapshots of everyday people. Salt Lake City also has our very own “Humans of” movement, thanks to the talent of a man named Mike Angelieri. We got the chance to talk with Mike about his Humans of Salt Lake City project here in our hometown. Salt Lake City is extraordinarily lucky to be one of the relatively few cities where this movement is gaining traction. Mike, a U.S. Army veteran who considers himself a Utah native, studied at the University of Utah and currently resides in Salt Lake with his wife and 18-year-old daughter. As an amateur photographer and blogger, he first developed an interest in bringing “Humans of” to Salt Lake after reading an article about HONY on MSNBC.com. After searching high and low to make sure no one else had already started in Salt Lake, he began his Facebook page and bought the domain for humansofsaltlakecity.com. Here’s the rest of our interview with Mike. How has the experience of the project shifted your worldview? It used to be that when I was downtown, going about my business, I didn’t take time to look at people. Not because I didn’t care but because my focus was just elsewhere. This experience has opened my eyes to the magic and majesty of people in different circumstances... I’ve discovered that in one way or another, everybody really is moving forward. Some are doing it with a certain elegance and stature…others are going about it very clumsily. I’m just trying to capture the proof that nobody is standing still. What has been one of the most pivotal stories you've heard from someone whose photo you've taken? The story I recently got from the woman who said she lives inside the recyclable garbage containers during the winter to keep warm really broke my heart. Here’s the story in her own words, along with a photo of her. "I've been out here on the streets for three winters and I stay in the recyclable garbage cans...you've got paper in there and paper is the warmest thing for you so you've got comfort under and over you. Put the lid down...you don't get wet from underneath or above and, being plastic, just like a plastic bag, it keeps you warm and dry and you don't freeze to death over the winter. You can't get in the great big ones because you might get dumped into a garbage truck. The recyclable containers are clean and big enough and it keeps you out of the weather. Nobody knows you're there so your stuff doesn't get stolen, and you're warm all night. Nobody wakes you up in the middle of the night kicking you saying you've gotta get up and go because you can't sleep on our sidewalks. I bet a lot of homeless people could use that info if you'd get it out there." Are most people pretty open with you, like the story above suggests, or are those few and far between? Most of the time, yes, people have been open, kind, interested, and honored to be included in the project. Occasionally, I get a nasty look or reaction…no big deal. Sometimes, when I ask if I can take someone’s pic and the answer is no, well, no means no. I don’t engage in hostility or pressure. I’ve always wondered how Brandon of HONY gets his shots -- does he just stop random people on the street and ask if he can take their picture? Do you do that? What is your approach? As I understand it, Brandon of HONY does just approach people, engages them in conversation, tells them what he is doing, gets a story from them, takes a portrait and posts it. I think New Yorkers are probably more accustomed to such unorthodoxy whereas Salt Lakers might be more wary. I tend to approach people with a conservative caution. Generally, if someone is sitting alone somewhere and unoccupied, I might strike up a conversation. Other times, if I walk by someone and smile at them and say hello…if they reply back, you can be pretty sure I’m gonna try to talk to them. Do you ever plan on compiling your work into a book like Brandon Stanton (HONY) did? If I can ever fully convince myself that I have enough material for a book, I would definitely pursue putting a book together. So far, I think I only have about 450 images…not sure that’s enough material. How long do you plan on working on this project? I have no plans to discontinue the project any time soon. I currently have had some medical issues that have kept me from taking more pix…and coincidentally, I’m not sure I want to take pix during the winter. When I started the project in October 2013, I stopped in November when the weather got cold and then, this spring, people started messaging me saying, ‘when are you going to start taking pics again?’ I may try to take pics in the winter…but I definitely plan on being back on the [...]

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If you’re not one of the over 11 million people who know about this movement, here’s a bit of background. Humans of New York began in November 2010 as the brainchild of Brandon Stanton. It was his goal to photograph 10,000 New Yorkers and plot them along with their photos on a map. However, as he began his work he started interacting with those he’d photograph, and this interaction turned into an interview of sorts. Fast forward to today, and Brandon has created a vast database of the human side of New York. His many photos of unique individuals along with tidbits of their own personal insights and stories are compiled into a New York Times Bestselling book.

HOSLC founder Mike Angelieri

HOSLC founder Mike Angelieri

After the worldwide success of Humans of New York (HONY), people in cities around the world supplemented the phenomenon with work of their own: Facebook pages for Humans of Berlin, Rome, Amsterdam and San Francisco have cropped up, creating candid snapshots of everyday people.

Salt Lake City also has our very own “Humans of” movement, thanks to the talent of a man named Mike Angelieri. We got the chance to talk with Mike about his Humans of Salt Lake City project here in our hometown.

Salt Lake City is extraordinarily lucky to be one of the relatively few cities where this movement is gaining traction. Mike, a U.S. Army veteran who considers himself a Utah native, studied at the University of Utah and currently resides in Salt Lake with his wife and 18-year-old daughter. As an amateur photographer and blogger, he first developed an interest in bringing “Humans of” to Salt Lake after reading an article about HONY on MSNBC.com. After searching high and low to make sure no one else had already started in Salt Lake, he began his Facebook page and bought the domain for humansofsaltlakecity.com. Here’s the rest of our interview with Mike.

How has the experience of the project shifted your worldview?

It used to be that when I was downtown, going about my business, I didn’t take time to look at people. Not because I didn’t care but because my focus was just elsewhere. This experience has opened my eyes to the magic and majesty of people in different circumstances… I’ve discovered that in one way or another, everybody really is moving forward. Some are doing it with a certain elegance and stature…others are going about it very clumsily. I’m just trying to capture the proof that nobody is standing still.

What has been one of the most pivotal stories you’ve heard from someone whose photo you’ve taken?

The story I recently got from the woman who said she lives inside the recyclable garbage containers during the winter to keep warm really broke my heart. Here’s the story in her own words, along with a photo of her.

humans-of-salt-lake

“I’ve been out here on the streets for three winters and I stay in the recyclable garbage cans…you’ve got paper in there and paper is the warmest thing for you so you’ve got comfort under and over you. Put the lid down…you don’t get wet from underneath or above and, being plastic, just like a plastic bag, it keeps you warm and dry and you don’t freeze to death over the winter. You can’t get in the great big ones because you might get dumped into a garbage truck. The recyclable containers are clean and big enough and it keeps you out of the weather. Nobody knows you’re there so your stuff doesn’t get stolen, and you’re warm all night. Nobody wakes you up in the middle of the night kicking you saying you’ve gotta get up and go because you can’t sleep on our sidewalks. I bet a lot of homeless people could use that info if you’d get it out there.”

Are most people pretty open with you, like the story above suggests, or are those few and far between?

Most of the time, yes, people have been open, kind, interested, and honored to be included in the project. Occasionally, I get a nasty look or reaction…no big deal. Sometimes, when I ask if I can take someone’s pic and the answer is no, well, no means no. I don’t engage in hostility or pressure.

I’ve always wondered how Brandon of HONY gets his shots — does he just stop random people on the street and ask if he can take their picture? Do you do that? What is your approach?

As I understand it, Brandon of HONY does just approach people, engages them in conversation, tells them what he is doing, gets a story from them, takes a portrait and posts it. I think New Yorkers are probably more accustomed to such unorthodoxy whereas Salt Lakers might be more wary. I tend to approach people with a conservative caution. Generally, if someone is sitting alone somewhere and unoccupied, I might strike up a conversation. Other times, if I walk by someone and smile at them and say hello…if they reply back, you can be pretty sure I’m gonna try to talk to them.

Do you ever plan on compiling your work into a book like Brandon Stanton (HONY) did?

If I can ever fully convince myself that I have enough material for a book, I would definitely pursue putting a book together. So far, I think I only have about 450 images…not sure that’s enough material.

How long do you plan on working on this project?

I have no plans to discontinue the project any time soon. I currently have had some medical issues that have kept me from taking more pix…and coincidentally, I’m not sure I want to take pix during the winter. When I started the project in October 2013, I stopped in November when the weather got cold and then, this spring, people started messaging me saying, ‘when are you going to start taking pics again?’ I may try to take pics in the winter…but I definitely plan on being back on the streets again when the spring comes again.

I notice that you’ve been promoting a fundraiser for Children and the Earth on your Facebook timeline. Could you tell us a bit more about this particular cause and why you chose this specific charity?

There’s a story about HONY that you might find interesting. In 2012, the fashion company DKNY approached Brandon with an offer to buy some of his images for an advertising campaign. He refused their offer. Later, in Thailand, it was discovered that DKNY had used some of his images without his permission. Rather than sue them, which he certainly had a right to do, he asked them to donate $100,000 to his local YMCA. They apologized and donated $25,000. He then started an Indiegogo fundraiser and, in a matter of hours, raised the other $75,000 plus an additional $103,000 for his local YMCA. When my page reached 3,000 followers, earlier this fall, I thought that maybe the page now has a voice that people might be listening to…so I engaged my followers by asking them to submit nominees representing any local bona-fide charity in the area for a few days. We collected 18 nominees. At that point, I invited my followers to start voting, American Idol-style, for whom we should do a fundraiser in time for Christmas. As the days and weeks went by, the bottom nominees getting the least votes were eliminated until during the last 3 days of voting, Children and the Earth ended up being the winning nominee. Then we started the “Humans to the Rescue’ fundraiser…we have a donate link on the website humansofsaltlakecity.blogspot.com. It’s all done through PayPal so it’s totally secure. Unfortunately, we’ve only raised about $150…so I’m thinking that the voice I thought the page had maybe isn’t as strong yet as I thought it would be. The fundraiser technically ends sometime on the 22nd at which time, we will give the proceeds of the fundraiser in their entirety to Children and the Earth. They are an organization that helps terminally ill children and their families, kind of in the vein of the Make A Wish Foundation.

What is your purpose and goal with HOSLC?

I’d like to see HOSLC become as powerful for good as HONY…I’d like it to serve as proof that people can still learn from one another…that people, regardless of circumstance, are worthy of study, attention, affection, kindness, and consideration.

What is the most important thing you’ve learned as a result of your project?

I have found that every soul I have photographed has a certain majesty and a beauty. Sometimes, it’s not obvious but it’s there waiting to be touched and drawn out. I think people have more good to offer each other than they might be willing to admit and that maybe, talking about themselves in their stories to a stranger such as myself, might help to shed even more light on that proof and lead to good things.

If our readers take away one thing from you, what would you want it to be?

Look closely at one another…be open to lives that are different…believe that we can all be taught and that we can learn from each other in all kinds of ways both big and small…that’s the only way we’re going to survive.

 

To learn more about HOSLC, find them on Facebook, Instagram (@humansofslcity) and their blog. To learn more about and donate to Children and the Earth, click here.

 

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Interview with Ray Francom from Ray’s Barbershop SLC http://www.gslclothing.com/interview-ray-francom-rays-barbershop/ Wed, 17 Dec 2014 17:11:31 +0000 http://www.gslclothing.com/?p=1872 In need of a haircut or fresh shave before your company Christmas party this year? Ray's Barbershop has got you covered with 3 locations, ranging from the far east side of SLC, through downtown, and up to Ogden. The barbershop is a place for men to hang out, network (think Twitter before the days of the internet), and escape the stresses of everyday life while being pampered for a little while. Ray's has been called "The Best Haircut in Salt Lake City", so we talked to Ray for a bit to get some more background on his experience in the barbershop industry and find out what brought him to Utah. Tell us about yourself. What brought you to Utah and why have you decided to stay? My story begins when I was 15 years of age my dad decided it would be a good idea to teach me the skill of barbering (my dad also being a barber). So I learned as much as I possible could from him but I could not get my license through his training so I would attend Cosmetology school in Ogden at the Weber ATC every summer between my high school years. At that time the licensing was not separate from the beauty license as it has become today. So even though I knew I wanted to focus on barbering I had to learn and pass my tests in performing perms, and hair coloring among other beauty services. I finally got my license when I was 18 and then shortly after left on an LDS mission to Jamaica where for the next two years I still used my barbering skills to cut other missionaries hair and even some Jamaicans. When I returned home I moved to Utah to attend the University of Utah with the thought that I would major in Architecture. This is something I always thought would be my future career and barbering would just be a back up trade in case I ever became unemployed. After two years of school I decided to change directions and made Barbering my full time work. When I turned 25 I found an abandoned barber shop closer to home and wondered if I could possible open this shop up and make it work for me. That was my original location which was only had room enough for 3 chairs. I worked there alone for the first year and a half and then eventually started hiring other barbers to fill the other two chairs. We eventually got busy enough where I decided to expand the shop to a 9 chair shop. 3 years after that I opened the 12 chair shop downtown and 2 years later opened the Ogden Shop which is still fairly new and still growing. What do you remember about going to the barber as a kid? When it comes to my memories of what I remember most about visiting the barber shop as a kid, is going to be a little different from what others might have. As I mentioned before my dad was a barber and so was my grandfather and the two of them worked out of the same shop in Green River, Wyoming. Their shop was right across the street from where we lived and so I remember getting haircuts very often and also having no say in what kind of haircut I got. I also remember that if a paying customer walked in while I was in the middle of getting my haircut then I had to jump out of the barber chair no matter what stage my haircut was in and wait till business died down again. I also had the job of cleaning that barber shop so I remember emptying out the ash trays and sweeping all the hair. You have three locations for your shops now. How has the process of expanding been? Any plans for future expansion? I have been growing and expanding Ray's Barber Shop right now I am in the process again. I am working with a beauty school from Payson called American Beauty Academy to open another location in Murray, and at this location we will be adding a barbering program to go along with the cosmetology program. I am really excited about this as I really enjoy teaching and showing other the craft of barbering as it is truly an art form. I have worked with apprentices in the past but by developing a full blown barbering program I am excited to be a part of the history being made in this profession. It says on your website, Ray’s is “a place to escape and be pampered” – What are some of the ways you fulfill that promise to your customers? I have taken a lot of pride in keeping the barber shops that we have opened to the traditional roots that I experienced in my dad's barber shop. I think when we say the we create a place to escape and be pampered we truly give our customers that experience. When we get a customer in the barber chair it is possibly the only time where they sit down and just relax without the distractions of cell phones and life in general. One of my favorite part about this business is that when we are finished with the haircut you can just tell how good it makes the customer feel. I don't mean to sound too philosophical but I think there is something about getting a new haircut that renews a person. It builds confidence from within and it makes them feel like they can conquer the world, kind of like when you get a new pair of shoes and you feel like you are walking on air. Any interesting trends in men's grooming over the last several years? Over the twenty years that I have been barbering I have seen styles come and go, when I first started cutting hair I would be working and remember this [...]

The post Interview with Ray Francom from Ray’s Barbershop SLC appeared first on Great Salt Lake Clothing Company.

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In need of a haircut or fresh shave before your company Christmas party this year? Ray’s Barbershop has got you covered with 3 locations, ranging from the far east side of SLC, through downtown, and up to Ogden.

The barbershop is a place for men to hang out, network (think Twitter before the days of the internet), and escape the stresses of everyday life while being pampered for a little while. Ray’s has been called “The Best Haircut in Salt Lake City”, so we talked to Ray for a bit to get some more background on his experience in the barbershop industry and find out what brought him to Utah.

Tell us about yourself. What brought you to Utah and why have you decided to stay?
My story begins when I was 15 years of age my dad decided it would be a good idea to teach me the skill of barbering (my dad also being a barber). So I learned as much as I possible could from him but I could not get my license through his training so I would attend Cosmetology school in Ogden at the Weber ATC every summer between my high school years. At that time the licensing was not separate from the beauty license as it has become today. So even though I knew I wanted to focus on barbering I had to learn and pass my tests in performing perms, and hair coloring among other beauty services. I finally got my license when I was 18 and then shortly after left on an LDS mission to Jamaica where for the next two years I still used my barbering skills to cut other missionaries hair and even some Jamaicans. When I returned home I moved to Utah to attend the University of Utah with the thought that I would major in Architecture. This is something I always thought would be my future career and barbering would just be a back up trade in case I ever became unemployed. After two years of school I decided to change directions and made Barbering my full time work. When I turned 25 I found an abandoned barber shop closer to home and wondered if I could possible open this shop up and make it work for me. That was my original location which was only had room enough for 3 chairs. I worked there alone for the first year and a half and then eventually started hiring other barbers to fill the other two chairs. We eventually got busy enough where I decided to expand the shop to a 9 chair shop. 3 years after that I opened the 12 chair shop downtown and 2 years later opened the Ogden Shop which is still fairly new and still growing.

What do you remember about going to the barber as a kid?
When it comes to my memories of what I remember most about visiting the barber shop as a kid, is going to be a little different from what others might have. As I mentioned before my dad was a barber and so was my grandfather and the two of them worked out of the same shop in Green River, Wyoming. Their shop was right across the street from where we lived and so I remember getting haircuts very often and also having no say in what kind of haircut I got. I also remember that if a paying customer walked in while I was in the middle of getting my haircut then I had to jump out of the barber chair no matter what stage my haircut was in and wait till business died down again. I also had the job of cleaning that barber shop so I remember emptying out the ash trays and sweeping all the hair.

You have three locations for your shops now. How has the process of expanding been? Any plans for future expansion?
I have been growing and expanding Ray’s Barber Shop right now I am in the process again. I am working with a beauty school from Payson called American Beauty Academy to open another location in Murray, and at this location we will be adding a barbering program to go along with the cosmetology program. I am really excited about this as I really enjoy teaching and showing other the craft of barbering as it is truly an art form. I have worked with apprentices in the past but by developing a full blown barbering program I am excited to be a part of the history being made in this profession.

It says on your website, Ray’s is “a place to escape and be pampered” – What are some of the ways you fulfill that promise to your customers?
I have taken a lot of pride in keeping the barber shops that we have opened to the traditional roots that I experienced in my dad’s barber shop. I think when we say the we create a place to escape and be pampered we truly give our customers that experience. When we get a customer in the barber chair it is possibly the only time where they sit down and just relax without the distractions of cell phones and life in general. One of my favorite part about this business is that when we are finished with the haircut you can just tell how good it makes the customer feel. I don’t mean to sound too philosophical but I think there is something about getting a new haircut that renews a person. It builds confidence from within and it makes them feel like they can conquer the world, kind of like when you get a new pair of shoes and you feel like you are walking on air.

Any interesting trends in men’s grooming over the last several years?
Over the twenty years that I have been barbering I have seen styles come and go, when I first started cutting hair I would be working and remember this was in the mid 90’s but I would literally be cutting bowl cut after bowl cut. Then I have observed style shift to the Cesar haircut to the Shag then onto the Blow Out, then the Fuax Hawk and as of lately we have seen the side part come back very strong. But over all those changes there is always going to be haircuts that stand the test of time such as a business mans cut. The cool thing about barbering is no head of hair is the same, dealing with different hair patterns, hair types, and cowlicks always make each haircut interesting and as long as you understand the traditional barbering techniques you can face any haircut or style that might come your way.

We are both working on growing out our beards. Any advice for maintaining a nice healthy beard?
I have noticed the beard trend that has come on strong the last year or so. In my years of barbering I have never done so many beard trims as we are currently doing. As far as beard grooming tips I would advise anyone who has already grown a beard or those who might be growing one out to keep it trimmed to maintain the health of the hair follicle. Just as we do with the hair on our heads as we grown it out it always stays healthier to keep it trimmed so that the hair follicle doesn’t split. I also encourage using a beard oil we have been working with local suppliers my favorites are Wild Bills and Barton’s. By using the beard oil it will help to condition the beard which result in better control and a softer feel to the hair.

Any advice to aspiring barbers or small business owners in the Salt Lake Valley in general?
For those aspiring barbers or small business owners out their, I have so much respect for what you are trying to do. Being a small business owner is not easy at all and no one really knows about the late hours you spend on your business and all the stress and work that you put into making it happen. But it is also one of the most rewarding experiences to see how something that was just a thought or even a dream can become a reality. Small business is what really makes this country so great and I applaud anyone who desires or is currently in this venture. Just never give up and keep dreaming!

You can check out Ray’s Barbershop online at their website and also at their Facebook page.

The post Interview with Ray Francom from Ray’s Barbershop SLC appeared first on Great Salt Lake Clothing Company.

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